Boston Cream Candy is very special and Christmas-y, but just in case it’s still hot weather where you live, not to worry. This candy is made on the stovetop. You’ll need at least a 3-quart saucepan so it doesn’t boil over. You will also need a candy thermometer or digital instant-read thermometer. This candy is a fudge consistency and is a caramel-ish flavor. I do put the pecans in when I make it, because I think it makes the candy texture less boring and plain, but other readers have successfully made it without the pecans, so feel free to omit those if you don’t care for nuts. This recipe was developed by Fine Cooking Magazine.

Ingredients

  • Pat of butter to grease the pan
  • 4 tablespoons butter (note if it is salted or unsalted)
  • pinch of salt, only if you’re using unsalted butter
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1/2 cup light colored Karo syrup
  • 1/4 cup half and half
  • 1/4 cup whipping cream (either heavy cream or regular cream is fine)
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2/3 cup chopped pecans (optional)

Start by lining an 8-inch square pan with parchment paper. Then butter the paper.

In your saucepan, combine all except the last 3 ingredients. Cook over medium-low heat until all the sugar is dissolved and you don’t feel any graininess when you stir. This might take a while, that is normal. Increase the heat to medium, and cook until boiling. Add the baking soda, turn heat down to medium-low again, and stir, stir, stir because the mixture will foam up quite a bit. Eventually the foaming will subside and it will start to look like caramel. Continue cooking over medium low heat, while continuing to stir. Now you can start measuring the temperature with your candy thermometer, though I prefer my digital instant-read thermometer. You want the candy to reach 240 degrees Farenheit, but not 241. Remove the pan from heat when it reaches 240.

If you are familiar with cooking traditional chocolate fudge, then you’ll be familiar with the next steps. Add the vanilla and stir. Add the pecans if you are using them. Stir, stir, stir until the candy starts to lose its gloss and become firm. My sister and I used to call this process “fudging up”.  When you can feel it “fudging up” while you’re stirring, quickly scrape it into your buttered 8″ square pan so it doesn’t completely fudge up your saucepan. You can put the candy in the fridge if you want to speed up the cooling process. It should be cool and ready to cut in 20-30 minutes if you leave it on the counter.

(Image credit: my own photo)

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