1900-era painting of 2 woman getting their cards read by a fortune teller

 

My great-grandmother kept a diary. Every year she started a new book. I happened to inherit her diary from the year 1908. One of the very first entries in January, she mentions going to a neighbor to have her fortune told.

To be honest, she mentions this half a dozen times throughout the calendar year. Clearly, this neighbor was something of a party trick. Although the Victorian era is known for fortune-telling parties around Halloween, my great-grandma’s diary somehow cements fortune-telling in my mind as being a New Year activity.

Get your family together and have your own fortune telling party. You could do paper fortune tellers, bake fortunes into cookies, roll fortunes into fruit rollups, or take turns pretending to read tea leaves or tarot cards (or anything, really). Be positive and have some laughs.

(Image credit: Alma Erdmann)

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